Migrants' Rights Network

Community Life Survey: Focus on Diversity

The publication highlights some of the key measures collected through the 2016/17 Community Life Survey and compares responses between various demographic groups. The survey is helpful for those looking for more information on how ‘cohesion’ works. It also dispels some long-held myths around ‘integration’.

Key highlights:

Older people were more likely than younger people to agree that their local area is a place where people from different backgrounds get on well together.

People who live in the most deprived areas were less likely to agree they feel they belong to Britain than those in the least deprived areas.

Black and Asian people were more likely to feel they are able to influence decisions affecting their local area than White people.

Respondents were asked how often they chat to their neighbours more than just to say hello. Overall, 73% of respondents said they chat to their neighbours at least once a month.

The largest differences were seen between age groups, with older people more likely to chat to their neighbours than younger people. Only 46% of 16-24 year olds said they chat with their neighbours regularly compared with 88% of those aged 75 or older.

There were some differences between ethnic groups, with White people being more likely to say they chat to their neighbours than Asian people (74% compared with 67% respectively).

Respondents were asked if they agreed that their local area is place where people from different backgrounds get on well together. Overall 81% of people either said they either definitely or tended to agree. Asian people were more likely to agree than White and Black people (85% compared with 81% and 77% respectively).

Respondents were asked how strongly they felt they belonged to Britain. Overall, 85% of respondents said they either felt very or fairly strongly that they belong to Britain.

Most differences between ethnic groups were not statistically significant, although White and Asian people were more likely to say they felt they belonged to Britain

The survey goes onto to look at volunteering, civic participation and loneliness.

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